Worms and Flowers

Friday Garden Update #8

Posted in Friday Garden Update by Lzyjo on July 17, 2009

This was the week  of the pepper.

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Our hot pepper plants yielded a bountiful amount of chilies.

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Sheepnose Pimento

The sweet peppers are starting to set fruit in earnest.

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Marconi Sweet Pepper

My overwintered chili is producing great quantities of fruit and branching out widely.

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I guess we’ll see is 19 pepper plants are too many!

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There seems to be a problem with blight on my tomatoes, come to think of it, this may have been a contributing factor to the potato failure.

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There are tons of green tomatoes and still not a lot of red ones, even so I’ve harvested about 1 pound and a half.

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My midsummer succession plantings are coming in. There are summer squashes and corn where the potatoes were this spring.

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After a stern talking to my hyacinth bean has grown tremendously in the past week!

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This Charentais melon, a true cantaloupe, is really pissing me off. It is growing SOOOO slowing and the yields have been, in a word, unimpressive. I think I shall have a word with this straggler in the afternoon!

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The harvest tally stands at 66.52. With the expenses factored in we are -15.33, the break even point is in sight!!!

I apologize for presenting another bee/sunflower picture, but I just can’t resist taking them! These ( I think they are carpenter bees) were fighting for a place on this popular flower!

Have a great weekend and, my fellow Tennesseans, enjoy the cool weather!!

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10 Responses

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  1. tina said, on July 17, 2009 at 10:56 AM

    Your vegetable garden is looking most great! On a par with the one at UT and they have tons of students. You must be a wonder woman to keep up with those weeds:)

    OMG, Tina, that is SUCH a compliment!!! I think they key is persistence, the weeds are WAY over grown in some areas, but I try to do a little bit every day!

  2. Jen said, on July 17, 2009 at 12:30 PM

    Awesome!! My peppers are like, the size of a dime. It’s so hard to be patient about produce.

    I agree, patience is really hard, I’ve picked many a vegetable before it was ready! One thing I like about hybrid peppers, especially, is how fast they grow, both the fruits and plants, bell peppers on the other hand, I can never get those to grow. Don’t despair, it’s only July, they’ll get going!

  3. Gail said, on July 17, 2009 at 12:31 PM

    Beautiful green…don’t those peppers look delicious…We gave a friend a hot sauce making kit for Christmas last year and he’s making hot sauce with all his bounty. Don’t apologize for the sunflowers…I show PPPP all spring and the Susans all summer long! gail

  4. Darla said, on July 17, 2009 at 3:30 PM

    19 pepper plants are not too many…you can do so many things with them. Your garden looks great. I ripped out my hyacinth bean vine last night. I was huge, taking over everthing and not one single bloom. You can never post too many flower photos especially with the critters on them.

    I think mine may have started blooming because I sprinkled some high phosphate fertilizer around them, it might be why they weren’t flowering. I’m excited to try making ristras with the peppers! I love the critters too. Thanks for stopping by!

  5. inadvertentfarmer said, on July 17, 2009 at 4:52 PM

    Your garden is lovely! You can never have too many peppers and can never take too many pics of sunflowers! Kim

    Thanks Kim, I think I should have a folder for only sunflower shots, I have so many! Thanks for the compliments on that garden, you’re right too many pepper is a good thing!

  6. H Kutchin said, on July 18, 2009 at 6:58 PM

    First visit. Love the photos. I am just starting on the blog scene. I treach in a preschool garden and the children are currently enjoying fresh figs.

    I’ve added a link to your blog. It’s great that your teaching the kids to garden, there can’t be enough of those type of programs. Thanks for stopping by!

  7. Gururaj said, on July 19, 2009 at 5:50 PM

    Any tips on overwintering chili (the hot variety)? Do you transfer it to a planter and winter it indoors? The green chilli is an indispensable part of the Indian cuisine!

    Yes, I dig them up, chop the tops off and the trim the roots. Then I pot them up, water them once and again if I see new growth. I find they don’t require a lot of water in the winter. I’m going to try drying some green chilis with yogurt and salt, I read a recipe on the blog Mahanandi, I think it is an ingredient from Andhra. I hope I did not offend you by confessing my love for Bhangra music. I only have respect for other cultures.

  8. writeandcreate said, on July 20, 2009 at 7:58 PM

    Your garden looks wonderful, and your sunflower photos exquisite. I’m so eager for spring to arrive here. I really do become quite a bear in winter.

    I always forget that the season are reversed! I’m glad spring is coming you way, it’s such a nice season. I bet you can smell it soon!

  9. Dawn said, on July 20, 2009 at 10:02 PM

    Beautiful beds, I agree with my sister, your a working weeder if I say so!

    LOL, it’s funny I weed so much and there’s always more. I didn’t realize You and Tina are sisters. Whoops! I thought you were just friends and blogging pals! Thanks for stopping by!

  10. Gururaj said, on July 22, 2009 at 5:26 PM

    @Lzygo: Yes, I dig them up, chop the tops off and the trim the roots. Then I pot them up, water them once and again if I see new growth. I find they don’t require a lot of water in the winter. I’m going to try drying some green chilis with yogurt and salt, I read a recipe on the blog Mahanandi, I think it is an ingredient from Andhra. I hope I did not offend you by confessing my love for Bhangra music. I only have respect for other cultures.

    Thanks. I’ll try it this year. We sometimes pickle the hot chillies in lemon and salt. I have a feeling the yogurt and salt are used on the chillies and they are dried in the sun until they become hard. Then they are deep fried until black, crushed and mixed with rice and eaten.
    Hey! I love Bhangra music. Each time I hear it, I feel like doing the “shrug your shoulders” dance.


    Yes, that is exactly how they are used! I checked Indira’s blog for the name, she calls them majjiga mirapa. I’ve never tasted them, but it sounds like a delicious way to preserve the tons and tons of green chilies I’m harvesting! I’m so glad you like bhangra too.

    I’m going to overwinter mine again, it’s great to get an early start!


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