Worms and Flowers

Plumerias

Posted in Plumeria by Lzyjo on December 26, 2008

I have had my plumerias for a year now. It’s been great and I love them more than ever. It’s a pleasure to watch them bloom and to smell the fine fragrance whenever I pass by.Photobucket

This is an unknown, perhaps Cranberry, aka, Key West Red. Red is always so difficult to capture. The photos are fairly accurate, but, of course, the flowers are much more beautiful in person.

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We paid a pretty penny for this unknown plant, which is about five feet tall now. It’s good to see this investment finally blooming! This is, by far, the most expensive plant I own, but who can dispute the beauty of the flowers, in their various states of life. Oh, and the fragrance, it’s a wonderful, spicy, frangipani scent. It’s no wonder bees drunkenly linger in a stupor from the fragrant liquor.

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According to Merriam Webster’s definition of frangipani, fran-jə-ˈpa-nē, the word was used as early as 1675, deriving from the Italian nobleman Muzio Frangipane, who created a perfume imitating the fragrance of the plumeria, according to legend. We can credit the name Plumeria to Charles Plumier, the notable French botanist. Plumier was the first Botanist to discover fuchsias while exploring the Caribbean and South America at the end of the 1600s. Plumier was a member of the Minims, an off-shoot of the Roman Catholic Franciscans, who lived like hermits, in solitude, and even in caves. Aside from being a botanist and monk, he was a draughtsman, mathematician, and physicist. Plumier died in Peru in 1704, after completing more than 4,000 unique botanical drawings in numerous volumes. It was not until 1753 that the word Plumeria is referenced in honor of Plumier.

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These are my very own six month old plumeria seedlings! I got the seeds from India last year. Just by a visual inspection of the seeds I could see there was a diverse variety. I’ve got high hope for those two biggest ones. They are vigorous and just the color and shape of the leaves leads me to believe there are be a fine assortment of blooms in the future.

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I’m very excited about this seed pod that is maturing right now. It was totally unexpected. In fact it looked like the inflo was aborting, but suddenly I noticed this odd shaped protuberance growing where a flower would normally be.

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It’s been about two weeks since I noticed the pod. I can already see it starting to split into two segments. The pod will take eight to ten month to fully mature and ripen, although the majority of the growth will occur in the first two months.

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7 Responses

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  1. patientgardener said, on December 26, 2008 at 2:57 PM

    What a beautiful plant – I love the smell of frangipani

  2. Gururaj said, on December 27, 2008 at 7:42 AM

    Looking at your flowers – I suddenly remembered the same flowers that were growing around my house when I was in Bombay (in my childhood). Only they were white, and I still remember the heavenly fragrance! I believe we used to call them “champa.” Thanks for the photos – you have given me the incentive to get the seeds too. I’m planning to go to India sometime next month and will surely get them. I think if you got the seeds from India, they might be white in color with yellow streaks in the middle!

  3. Eric bronson said, on December 27, 2008 at 7:46 AM

    Beautiful, I can’t wait to see how those seedlings turn out. I don’t think I’ve ever had a seed pod on any of my plumies, I’ll have to keep my eye open now.

  4. lzyjo said, on December 27, 2008 at 8:40 AM

    I’m sure the ones in India are magnificent. Too bad they can’t grow into proper trees in this climate. I didn’t realize, are you an Indian living in Japan, or a Japanese personal who was born in India? Anyways have a nice trip, I hope everything goes safely for you given the terrorism situation. Happy travels.

  5. lzyjo said, on December 27, 2008 at 8:42 AM

    MMMM! I can’t wait for them to flower again!

  6. lzyjo said, on December 27, 2008 at 8:43 AM

    I’ve seen photos on the web of plants just loaded down with pods, I mean like forty (?) on one plant. I guess it just depends what pollinators are active in the area.

  7. Gururaj said, on December 28, 2008 at 6:06 AM

    lzygo@: “I’m sure the ones in India are magnificent. Too bad they can’t grow into proper trees in this climate. I didn’t realize, are you an Indian living in Japan, or a Japanese personal who was born in India? Anyways have a nice trip, I hope everything goes safely for you given the terrorism situation. Happy travels.”

    I’m an Indian living in Japan since the last 24 years; have lived in India the first 30 years of my life.
    I’m sure things are back to normal in Mumbai, but I’m sure nobody has forgotten the events a month ago. Regards.


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